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Giuliana Hazelwood

WHAT DREW YOU TO KATONAH YOGA?

After years of ballet and vinyasa training, I was getting very sick of relating to myself in the same way over and over again. I kept hitting the same walls (physically and mentally) and had this overwhelming craving to get over myself and find a new way of experiencing being in my body. I knew there was something out there for me — something more pragmatic that still felt magical and elegant, but I knew I couldn’t quite get there on my own repeating what I was already doing.

HOW HAS KATONAH YOGA CHANGED YOUR PRACTICE & TEACHING?

Katonah gave me a framework to approach myself, my practice and my teaching from a formal place. It taught me the beauty of a boundary and by giving me a better container for my emotions, creativity and vision, it also gave me the freedom and techniques to overcome my biggest hurdles instead of sinking into my most primitive habits and patterns that kept me stuck. Katonah also gave me a home practice worth its salt. Abbie always tells us how our practice will really change when we start a home practice, and that is absolutely what happened to me. Once I brought the practice home with me, it changed literally every part of my life.

HOW HAVE YOU SEEN KATONAH YOGA CHANGE STUDENTS?

I love the moment when someone receives an adjustment, because it’s a great little snapshot of how the Katonah “magic” really works. Our adjustments help people let go of their personal attachment to the way they have held a pose together and when someone gets a really great adjustment, the whole room never fails to break out in “oohs and ahhhs,” because we all know how profound that experience can be. In the Katonah practice you are really seen by your teachers and your community, and it’s beautiful to watch others feel recognized, safe and free to rise up out of their personal foibles. What you really get to witness is people detaching from their pathologies and finding a new, more hopeful narrative.

Trust that the potency of this practice comes with time and repetition. Eventually your efforts will turn into grace over and over and over again.
— Giuliana